Category Archives: NHS managers

A night (or two) on a hospital trolley is better than living on the street. Asda type performance will not help…

Aneurin Bevan would not have accepted a night on a trolley as a compromise when he set up the former NHS. The cost of looking after overseas visitors is minimal, and not an important financial loss, but it does signify how we expect nobody to pay anything at all! Politicians have big salaries, good holidays, secure pensions, and access to London hospitals. If they want to they can avoid the A&E waits and mistakes and go privately. They usually do…. It will all get worse unless our managers and Trust Board Directors speak out honestly. Co-payments are not as bad as a failing service..

Cartoon 11.02.2017

Michael Sainato in the Guardian 14th November 2019 reminds us of why we live in one of four “Mutualised health services”. ‘I live on the street now’: how the insured fall into medical bankruptcy – Having health insurance is often not enough to save Americans from massive debts when serious illness strikes

Iain Williams on 14th Feb 2015 opined: £1 coin for your hospital trolley? The NHS’s supermarket-style makeover – cartoon

A government minister has said the NHS should be more like Asda. Should we expect bogof deals on hip replacements?

Even London and the Home Counties are feeling the squeeze… as standards and staff numbers fall re revert to the pre-NHS divide.

Just some of the pain felt in the rural shires is now feeding into London and suburbia. Standards of staffing and clinical diagnosis and speed are all falling. The blame is long term political neglect and denial from an elected elite who always felt they had access to the best – in London. No longer… it is impossible to report on all GP surgery closures as there are so many. The reality is that private services for ambulance, GP, A&E etc will follow… Bevan wanted the same high standards for the miners as the bankers – instead the standards are falling, but as before we had a health service, the bankers can afford the private option.

Owen Sheppard for MyLondon reports 7th September 2019: West London overspends by £112m!!

GP surgeries across Surrey are facing an uncertain future, with two confirmed closures and a third possibly following suit, which are set to put pressure on those nearby.

Patients say they are worried about the pressures on neighbouring services following the announcement of closures of surgeries in Staines and Guildford.

In Burpham, a petition has been launched to save the Burpham New Inn surgery which is also facing closure.

So why are surgeries closing?

The Guildford and Waverley Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has cited problems with leases and premises, which have led to the closures of two practices in the area.

In Staines, the Staines Thameside Medical Practice shut on Saturday (August 31) following a decision by the doctors to end their contract with the NHS to provide GP services. This was reportedly due to personal reasons.

Patients will lose the St Nicolas branch surgery in Bury Fields, Guildford, which will close at the end of October following issues with the premises and its lease.

Guildford and Waverley CCG has confirmed the surgery will close on October 24. All services will instead be provided by the main surgery at Guildford Rivers Practice in Hurst Farm, Milford.

One St Nicolas patient, who did not wish to be named, said: “I am very upset about the closure of St Nicolas Surgery, it came as a shock.

“[I believe] this was pre-planned since last year but without telling patients previously. I have not received a letter as yet about the closure.

“I think it’s been about a year that all the telephone calls to St Nicolas Surgery have been re-directed to the general practice in Milford.

“The closure of St Nicolas Surgery will put extra pressure on other GP surgeries in Guildford as patients who are ill, disabled, elderly or who don’t drive won’t be able to get to Milford.”

The CCG has said it will work with the practice to ensure that despite the changes, patients will continue to receive high quality care.

A spokesman said: “The CCG received an application from Guildford Rivers Practice that proposed the closure of its branch surgery, St Nicolas Surgery, due to issues with the premises and the lease which was proposed to have had a negative impact on the service offered to patients.

“Following a period of engagement with patients and neighbouring GP practices, the application to close the branch has now been approved by Guildford and Waverley’s Primary Care Commissioning Committee (PCCC).”

The spokesman added: “Registered patients of Guildford Rivers Practice will remain so, following the branch closure, with GPs from St Nicholas Surgery transferring to the main site and continuing to offer appointments to patients.

“Any patients who require home visits will continue to receive these in the usual way.

“The practice is committed to providing the best service for patients by operating solely from the Guildford Rivers Practice main site and the CCG will work with the practice to ensure patients continue to receive safe and high quality care moving forward.”

The news comes as patients await the decision on the future of Burpham’s New Inn surgery. A decision was set to be made on August 28 but this has been delayed.

A spokesman for Guildford and Waverley CCG said: “The PCCC has been re-arranged to ensure every option put to the CCG is fully explored, before a final decision is made.

“The committee has been rescheduled for September 13.”

In a letter to patients sent on July 31, the CCG said it was likely the New Inn Surgery in London Road would have to close later in 2019 due to problems securing a long-term home.

The letter said the surgery’s lease was expiring and no other suitable alternative sites have been found.

Patients launched a petition to save the surgery, which has been signed by 282 people to date.

Staines

Around 4,500 patients have had to re-register with another GP surgery after Staines Thameside Medical Practice closed its doors on Saturday (August 31).

Other GP surgeries in the area are accepting new patients despite some having recently had their lists capped.

Two Staines councillors are concerned about the additional pressure on those surgeries.

Councillor Jan Doerfel, Green Party member for Staines, said: “Expecting other GP practices to absorb the additional 4,500 patients is likely to result in longer waiting times for all those affected and additional travel for those that had to enrol with those practices. This is not acceptable.”

Councillor Veena Siva, Labour member for the ward, said: “Yet another GP surgery closes. Smaller practices are closing due to underfunding and insufficient GPs which means they can no longer be run safely and sustainably.”

She added: “As it stands, it is unfortunately no surprise that there was no interest from GPs to take over the surgery when in doing so all they would face is under-resourcing, enormous pressure and stress.”

NHS North West Surrey Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) was responsible for supporting patients as they switched to a different GP service.

St David’s Family Practice Doctor Jagit Rai works at one of the surgeries receiving patients from Staines Thameside and is a governing body member at NHS North West CCG.

Doctor Rai said: “The closure of this practice does not relate to funding or staff shortages. The CCG was disappointed to receive notification from GPs at Staines Thameside of their decision to end their contract with the NHS to run the surgery.

“They made this decision due to a change in personal circumstances that could not have been predicted or planned for. The CCG asked neighbouring practices about the option to take over the running of Staines Thameside and reviewed their capacity to take on new patients.

“The surgeries decided the best way to care for Staines Thameside patients is at their practices where they can benefit from an established team and range of services.”

It’s slightly brighter news for the residents in Chiddingfold, where a new surgery is being built after the former building was destroyed by a fire.

Chiddingfold Surgery in Ridgley Road was gutted on January 7, 2019.

Plans were submitted in March to Waverley Borough Council for the complete rebuild.

The surgery has relocated to Cedar ward at Milford Hospital, where full doctor and nurse surgeries are in place. Expanded opening hours are available for patients at Dunsfold surgery.

Update : Diane Taylor in the Guardian 8th September 2019: London GPs told to restrict specialist referrals under new NHSThe New “Rationing Plan”. Plans for new cuts sent same day Boris Johnson reinforced NHS spending commitments..

NHS s compared to 10 days for public sectors workers generally (10 days) and private sector (5 days) NHS staff take average of 14 sick days a year

You are twice as likely to take sick leave as a public sector than the private sector worker. Those who take least sickness are the self employed. If you are self employed you cannot get Statutory Sick Pay as you are working for yourself and therefore do not have an employer. GPs are self employed, but more and are becoming “salaried”, and of the new entrants a large majority are women. If GPs do become self employed, rest assured their sickness rates will go up. I suspect rates for hospital doctors are rising right now..  without their hearts and minds believing it is sensibly founded this will continue and worsen..

In the public sector, 9.8 days were lost to sickness per employee last year (compared to 5.0 days in the private sector), while employees at businesses with 1,000 or more staff took 7.6 days off sick. Mean is the sum, or average, of a group of numbers in a set. Median is the middle value of a list of numbers.4 Jul 2018.

In 2017, women had, on average, 72% higher physician-certified sickness absence than men, compared with 33% higher self-certified sickness absence than men [42,43]. The present study therefore concentrates on the evaluation of longer sickness absences that may qualify for physician-certification.

Doctors in training had an average annual sickness rate of 1.1%, and the average rate among consultants was 1.2%. This compares with an average annual sickness absence rate of 4.2% for all NHS hospital staff, 4.5% for nurses, and 5.5% for ambulance workers.

Andrew Gregory in the Times 25th August reports: NHS staff take average of 14 sick days a year

Ashleigh Webber in “Personnel” on 4th July 2018 reports: Employees taking less time off sick, yet costing employers more.

NCBI resources Aug 1st 2018: Gender equality in sickness absence tolerance: Attitudes and norms of sickness absence are not different for men and women

Andrew Goddard 26th May 2018 in the BMJ: Doctors sickness rate is a third of other NHS staff. (And its even less in self employed GPs)

Physiotherapy and counselling for NHS staff in drive to cut sickness rates

Hospital job vacancies top 100,000 due to bad planning. NHSreality adds political short termism, & high sickness and absenteeism..

The NHS culture is sick – and so are its staff – But is there any “quick fix”?

Waste in the Health Services. It;s mainly due to staff absenses…

Cleaning up the UK Health Services, changing the culture and importing honesty..

A recent article in the BMJ pondered “Why Doctors Don’t take Sick leave”

Independant GPs: RCGP chair Clare Gerada calls for all GPs to become salaried

Update 31st Au9gst 2019:

Health Service Journal 30th Augu9st 2019 Managers most likely to say mental ill-health caused sick leave

Merto 25th August 2019: NHS workers’ most common reason for sick days is mental health issues and Sheffield Telegraph: Mental health problems main cause of sick days for NHS workers across England

The “Economist” acknowledges health rationing, but does not recognise that it is covert…. More and more anger to come.

How long will the UK citizens put up with untruths? How long will it take for the proper debate to begin? The Economist recognises rationing, Enoch Powell in “A new look at Medicine and Politics” recognised rationing in 1966. We cannot go on without knowing what (for us) will be unavailable. It is surely a human right to be able to plan for your own health, your family’s health, your death, and illnesses. No wonder citizens are getting more and more angry..

If we want to win the cooperation and hearts and minds of medical staff we need to find out the truth about what they think. BMA conferences full of retired and burnt out doctors may reject the “long term plan” but there is no link with the doctors at the coal face.

Image result for angry patient cartoon

Not only is devolution a failure (certainly in Wales) but the 4 different systems allow different language of obfuscation, different methods of rationing, and outcomes. The anger will be the same.

The East Anglian daily Times shows how angry and dissatisfied the citizens are becoming. If you multiply the figures up over 200 health staff are attacked daily in the UK.

NHS GPs Economist 0619 Whats up Doc June 2019

Enoch Powell 4 Supply and Demand – Rationing  Minister of health for 3 years 2nd Edition 1974

Toni Hazell 28th June in GP mag: Here are two potential problems with primary care networks.  Huge hurry, and who takes responsibility?

Andrew Papworth reports 30th June 2019 in the East ANglian Times : “NHS staff aren’t punchbags”: Shock as six workers a day attacked in Suffolk by patients.

BMA ARM: Doctors spurn NHS long term plan

NHS patients ‘face more treatment rationing since coalition restructuring’

Wales is bust, and cannot pay for its citizens care. Devolution has failed. This is the thin end of a very large wedge..

Image result for angry patient cartoon

Image result for angry patient cartoon

 

Is it wrong to earn a living or make a profit out of health related services? Does it matter if the profit goes overseas if the provider is more efficient than our own?

In a factually truthful account of how we have tried to exclude inefficiencies, improve purchasing and delivery, Ian Birrell points out that we have outsourced many services. Many firms, including both domestic, and foreign ones based overseas, make profits from “patients’ misery”. All healthcare for curative services has an element of pain or misery, and once extended to prevention becomes part of the “worried well” psyche prevalent in our affluent society. Anyone would think it was wrong to earn a living or make a profit out of health related services. Does it matter if the profit goes overseas if the provider is more efficient than our own? Should the longer term implications of delegating more and more to overseas businesses be discussed?

Image result for healthy profit a bad word cartoon

Ian Birrell in the Times asks 4th June 2019: Worried about US healthcare giants? They’re already here.

The response could not have been clearer when Woody Johnson, US ambassador to Britain, suggested that American firms would want access to the NHS in any post-Brexit trade deal. “The NHS is not for sale,” thundered the health secretary, Matt Hancock. “The NHS as a publicly run, publicly owned institution is part of our DNA,” added his predecessor, Jeremy Hunt, now foreign secretary.

This was a predictable response as political rivals seized on the ambassador’s “terrifying” comments, especially when both men are engaged in a leadership battle. But it is also untrue. Lucrative chunks of the NHS have already been handed to rapacious American healthcare giants with disastrous consequences. And this pair of posturing politicians have done little to thwart them.

Image result for profit a bad word cartoon

Remember Winterbourne View, where the BBC exposed abuse of patients with autism and learning disabilities in a secure hospital unit eight years ago? The response was unequivocal: such people should not be held in these places since community care tends to be cheaper, kinder and more effective. Yet efforts to end such abusive detention failed. For as the NHS pulled out, private firms muscled in on contracts worth up to £14,000 a week, while many staff continue to be paid little more than minimum wage and there is no real accountability.

More than 2,200 such patients remain trapped in assessment and treatment units and the proportion in privately run beds rose from a fifth to more than half in a decade. Acadia, a Tennessee healthcare firm, spent £1.3 billion on the Priory Group, which takes £720 million annually from taxpayers. Universal Health Services, another US firm, recently snapped up psychiatric services including Danshell, owner of a Durham hospital that just featured in another Panorama exposé of abuse. Its UK operations are run by Cygnet Health Care, which having tweeted it was “shocked and deeply saddened by the allegations” nonetheless boasts in its latest accounts of revenues from 220 NHS purchasing bodies and profits surging to £40.4 million.

It is shameful that our fellow citizens can still be stuffed in places where they are subjected to solitary confinement, violent restraint, hatch feeding and forced sedation. The legacy is damaged minds, devastated families, sometimes even death. This scandal offers frightening insight into wider failures in psychiatric services. It is taking place in secretive units — scores of them owned by American firms and funded by the state.

The private sector is not solely to blame. But instead of posing as valiant guardians of the NHS, how much better if we could trust a health secretary to protect patients from foreign firms making profits from their misery.

Image result for profit a bad word cartoon

Melting down….We are all getting what we deserve. Without honesty to ration overtly the system will only get worse.

The profession has been warning the different UK governments and Health Administrators for decades that there would not be enough trained doctors, nurses and attached staff. Now that this is actually happening, what are the thoughts of NHSreality? You get what you deserve in a first past the post short time horizon system? You get what you deserve if you don’t do exit interviews, and destroy teams? You get what you deserve if the access is so poor that citizens are pushed into private care? But even if we had trained too many doctors etc, we would still have a system with unlimited demand, limited resources, and no disincentive to make a claim (other than prescription charges, travel and parking). We need exit interviews urgently, and in West Wales the threat of Hospital closure and of poor Out of Hours coverage is so bad that many people may choose to leave the area…..

Image result for meltdown hospital cartoon

The Nuffield Trust gives some background and insight into how we have got to this point, but without referencing rationing. The trust reports the worst April on record…

The paediatricians in Wales are over-working, but this is partly because of the shortage of GPs. They find that it is easier to refer many problems than to see them again and support in the community.

The radiologists are worried that their vast workload leads to mistakes (mainly of omission).

Nick Triggle for the BBC reports: GP pressure: Numbers show first sustained drop for 50 years

Its not just patients who are charged: Trainee doctors on call at night are often charged for sleeping!

In a world market the Irish Times reports that there are plenty of opportunities in the UK, but you will have to work “HARD”.

Image result for meltdown hospital cartoon

Perhaps Pembrokeshire will be the first area to “go private” and abandon the health service?

Do we need an Aspberger’s Teenager to tell it as it is…?

A GP in Bristol explains for Gulf News

A GP in Pembroke explains for those who don’t know that “the hours stink”.

 

The revolving door of health service managers….. mismanagement is nothiong less than neglect.

The mismanagement of the 4 health services that used to be the “National Health Service” amounts to nothing less than neglect.

We medics all know managers who move on quickly. Being fast on your feet is essential in a  service where nothing is addressed long term. Recruitment is a nightmare of under capacity, female bias, and the resultant manpower disaster means we need to recruit from overseas for decades. NHS looks abroad for thousands of nurses – Health chiefs admit failing to plan for elderly care

We jaundiced GPs and Consultants can only assume that these managers have no exit interviews, and that nobody wants to hear what they have to say any more than the professionals.

Chris Smyth reports 7th May 2019 in the Times: NHS register to stop ‘revolving door’

A professional register of NHS managers and a values test for senior leaders are being planned to stop a “revolving door” for failed bosses.

A health service scarred by bullying and stress “needs to be a better place to work”, an interim workforce plan concedes. Although the NHS acknowledges that unexpected pension tax bills are forcing doctors to retire early and work fewer shifts, plans to tackle that issue have been removed from a final version.

The NHS interim people plan makes the starkest acknowledgement yet that staff are leaving the health service because they are overworked, with increases in bullying, harassment and abuse all reported recently.

The plan promises staff that they can expect support on work-life balance, whistleblowing protection and equal opportunities. Specific details are yet to be decided but the plan pledges that more jobs should be part-time or term-time only.

The plan lays out how the management culture of the NHS had to change to “root out bullying and harassment” with an admission that all staff will have experienced a dysfunctional working environment at some point.

“It cannot be right that there are no agreed competencies for holding senior positions in the NHS or that we hold so little information about the skills, qualification or career history of our leaders,” the plan states.

“A series of reports over the last decade have all highlighted a ‘revolving door’ culture where leaders are quietly moved elsewhere in the NHS, facilitated by ‘vanilla’ references,” the plan continues. “These practices must end.”

A government-ordered review has previously recommended a set of core skills for managers. The NHS has now pledged to draw up “an explicit set of competencies, values and behaviours required in different senior leadership roles”. This could include, for example, honesty and protecting patient safety.

Ministers have previously promised a central database of directors’ qualifications. The NHS has now pledged to “develop options to create a registration scheme for NHS managers similar to those used in other healthcare professions and in finance”. It is unclear whether such registration would be compulsory. The plan concedes: “The lack of a transparent, fair and consistent process for the appraisal of senior leaders has contributed substantially to the challenges we face today.”

The plans do not address higher pension taxes for top earners, which are forcing many consultants to retire early or turn down extra shifts to avoid bills for tens of thousands of pounds.

Mistakes due to overwork are manslaughter. Not enough sickness and absenteeism? Nobody blames the management and politicians… “Wise doctors will retreat from the front line now?”

The Health Services Procurement – inefficient and risky… Centralisation and management control is needed

This mismanagement of the NHS amounts to neglect

Image result for revolving door cartoon