A night (or two) on a hospital trolley is better than living on the street. Asda type performance will not help…

Aneurin Bevan would not have accepted a night on a trolley as a compromise when he set up the former NHS. The cost of looking after overseas visitors is minimal, and not an important financial loss, but it does signify how we expect nobody to pay anything at all! Politicians have big salaries, good holidays, secure pensions, and access to London hospitals. If they want to they can avoid the A&E waits and mistakes and go privately. They usually do…. It will all get worse unless our managers and Trust Board Directors speak out honestly. Co-payments are not as bad as a failing service..

Cartoon 11.02.2017

Michael Sainato in the Guardian 14th November 2019 reminds us of why we live in one of four “Mutualised health services”. ‘I live on the street now’: how the insured fall into medical bankruptcy – Having health insurance is often not enough to save Americans from massive debts when serious illness strikes

Iain Williams on 14th Feb 2015 opined: £1 coin for your hospital trolley? The NHS’s supermarket-style makeover – cartoon

A government minister has said the NHS should be more like Asda. Should we expect bogof deals on hip replacements?

This entry was posted in A Personal View, NHS managers, Stories in the Media, Trust Board Directors on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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