Health Services might be designed wrongly: In praise of dissenters.. Currently there is little ability to speak out, “without fear of sanction”.

The Different health services in the UK are not open to the suggestion that they might be designed wrongly. They are failing more quickly than anyone imagined (other than those in the profession, and NHSreality). An interview with Helen Stokes-Lampard (RCGP chair) In “You and Yours” on Radio 4 17th October 2019 tells it straight: its going to take at least 12 years to remedy the failure in forward and manpower planning. (The interview is at the end of the recording) The culture of fear means that opportunities to learn constructively are being lost, educational standard are falling, and engagement with the politics of health is minimal. One route to honesty is the exit interview, and these collated together could give messages that lead to the changes needed. Meanwhile……  “Winter is coming”. We will all be hearing how they will listen (See Jill Patterson in Walesonline below), but NHSreality can tell you that even if they hear, they don’t have the human resources to act. 

In Bartleby in The Economist 12th October 2019 “In praise of dissenters – It pays companies to encourage a variety of opinions “

The ability to speak up within an organisation, without fear of sanction, is known as “psychological safety” and was described by Amy Edmondson of the Harvard Business School in a book on the issue. Mr Syed cites a study of teams at Google, which found that self-reported psychological safety was by far the most important factor behind successful teamwork at the technology giant. ….“In praise of dissenters

As many practices disintegrate, I give a link to a local practice in the news.

Eleanor Philpotts in Pulse 12th October 2019 reports on Ferryside practice.: Practice set to close after 3 years without a GP

In Walesonline Sandra Hembury on 14th October reports: The GP surgery that hasn’t had a GP for over 3 years..

A doctors’ surgery hasn’t had a GP working there for three years and is now being threatened with closure.

The Mariners Surgery in Ferryside has only had nurse sessions since 2016, because there were no GPs available to operate from it.

Now plans have been unveiled to close the surgery and relocate services to other practices, forcing patients to have to travel for miles to receive treatment.

A public drop-in session is being held to consult with patients at the Three Rivers Hotel in Ferryside between 2pm and 7pm tomorrow (Tuesday, October 15).

But there are fears those less mobile patients will struggle to get to the next nearest surgeries in the Meddygfa Minafon practice – in Kidwelly or Trimsaran.

Cllr Mair Stephens is ward councillor for St Ishmael and deputy leader of Carmarthenshire County Council.

She said the Carmarthen Road practice had been there for a number of years.

“There’s traditionally been a dispensing surgery, which is exactly what we do need,” she said.

“The majority of people who live in the area are older, and the surgery has been on the decline in recent years, but it still has such things as foot clinics and heart clinics.

“They are now going to close it, which is out of all proportion.”

She said the nearest surgery in the group was Minafon in Kidwelly, which was about four miles away. But it was difficult to get to if patients needed public transport. The nearest bus route to the Kidwelly surgery dropped passengers off at least 10 minutes away from the practice, which wasn’t suitable for the less mobile, she added.

She suggested the practice could set up a bus route taking passengers without suitable transport from the Ferryside surgery to Kidwelly.

Cllr Stephens added: “This is about moving services from their locality.

“What older people want to do is to see a GP. They don’t necessarily want to see a nurse.

“Once they have seen the doctor they are quite happy to meet a nurse or practitioner. That’s where the whole system seems to be falling down.”

She felt the consultation was not being spread out enough to the wider community, including nearby Llandyfaelog.

A petition has been set up to maintain the surgery in Ferryside.

Started by Ute Eden, it says: “We feel very strongly that it is essential to maintain a surgery in Ferryside.

“We need a doctor, a nurse and a dispensary to provide the vital services required by a village where most residents are over the age of 50.

“It is an integral part of Calon y Fferi Community Centre, which is very accessible.”

The petition, which has been signed by 44 people, said it would be a backward step to oblige all residents to leave the village for treatment.

Jill Paterson, director of primary care at Hywel Dda University Health Board, said: “As a health board we are committed to listening to and engaging with local populations around our proposals to relocate our primary care services from Mariners Surgery to neighbouring surgeries.

“We would therefore like to invite residents to come along and get involved in the conversation.

“Following a review of how services are used by patients at the surgery, it is becoming clear that these services are limited and not fully utilised and could be relocated to Minafon and Trimsaran Surgeries.”

This entry was posted in A Personal View, General Practitioners, Medical Education, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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