A&E standards fall – the end game means an opportunity for private A&E and Ambulance services in richer areas

Don’t wait until you are ill, or your next of kin needs emergency care. Try and think ahead to what options you have in your post code. In reality most of us will have no choice, but there may be a choice in the bigger cities. Certainly NHSreality expects market forces to mean private services expand. As A&E standards fall – the end game means an opportunity for private A&E and Ambulance services in richer areas. And its going to get worse…

It is all very well having long waits for access to GP and cold hospital care, but it is quite another when one of the holes in the safety net gets so large that the net has been removed. I can attest to the fall in standards from personal experience with a recent Right hand compartment syndrome that was ignored at first, and then operation was delayed, for a total of 18 hours. The recovery will be longer, and more painful than it might have been, but thank goodness I have kept my hand.

The failure in manpower and forward planning in general, the over supply of doctors who wish to work part time, and under supply of those who wish to work full time, rationing of medical school places, and lack of increased reward for working a shift pattern career are all part of the problem. There is no valuing of what are seen as temporary staff, and it has to get worse…

The Care Quality Commission

Henry Bodkin in the Telegraph 15th October: More than half A&E services failing

More than half of A&Es are now failing because patients who should be treated at home or in clinics are flooding through emergency departments’ “ever-open doors”, inspectors have warned.

The Care Quality Commission said breakdowns in provision for dementia and mental health patients are fueling the deterioration of standards….

ITV News: A&E under tremendous pressure as more departments need improvement (Standards fall)

Shaun Lintern in Health Service Journal: Regulator warns of ‘extraordinary’ winter for A&Es

  • Chief inspector warns of “extraordinary circumstances” for emergency departments this winter
  • Care model failure leaves hospitals overloaded
  • Watchdog warns of deterioration on mental health, learning disability and autism wards

A failure to provide the right models of care is forcing thousands more people to attend emergency departments each day, the Care Quality Commission has said, while warning of a “perfect storm” for the health service this winter……

Dennis Campbell in the Guardian: More than half of A&Es provide substandard care, says watchdog – Hospitals struggling to cope with rising numbers of patients who cannot get help elsewhere

Kaya Burgess in the Times: More than half of A&Es not up to job, says care watchdog

The health watchdog has warned that A&E departments are under “tremendous pressure”, with more than half now deemed inadequate or in need of improvement.

The Care Quality Commission’s annual State of Care ( England only) report also warned of a “perfect storm” across health and social care where people cannot access the services they need or where care is provided too late.

The regulator found that A&E standards had slipped over the past year and that emergency departments were the most likely part of a hospital to be ranked as inadequate.

In 2018-19, 44 per cent of urgent and emergency services were rated as requiring improvement — up from 41 per cent the year before — with a further 8 per cent deemed inadequate, up from 7 per cent the year before.

Inspectors said that A&E departments had not had their usual “breathing space” over the summer months to prepare for the perennial winter pressures.

He said: “We know that it’s a combination of increased demand and challenges around workforce [that] are creating something of a perfect storm and if that perfect storm is allowed to continue we will have a number of problems.”

He said that the 18-week waiting list for planned hospital treatment had grown from about 3 million people to 4.4 million over the past five years.

The CQC also warned of a “serious deterioration” in the quality of inpatient services for people with mental health problems, autism or learning disabilities. About 7 per cent of child and adolescent mental health services were rated inadequate last year, up from 3 per cent the year before.

Mr Trenholm said: “We also know that adult social care remains fragile. We know that the failure to agree a long-term funding solution is driving instability in the sector.”

Sally Warren, director of policy at the King’s Fund health charity, said: “The CQC’s report provides further evidence that staffing is the make-or-break issue across the NHS and social care. Staff are working under enormous strain as services struggle to recruit, train and retain enough staff with the necessary skills.”

Nick Scriven from the Society for Acute Medicine said: “At some point in the near future all these sustained and repeated problems with increasing demand, inadequate workforce that is haemorrhaging senior cover, the pension tax crisis, crumbling estates, insufficient community medical care and community social care in general totally under-provisioned, we will reach a vital tipping point and care will be compromised despite all the heroic efforts by the human side of this, the staff in post.”

An NHS spokesman welcomed the watchdog’s finding that quality standards had remained stable when taken as a whole and said: “While the NHS Long Term Plan set out an extra £4.5 billion to ramp up GP and community care, the CQC rightly highlights the need for a long-term solution to adult social care so that older and vulnerable people get the right care when they need it.”

March 2015 NHSreality: From bad to worse: “NHS medical accidents investigation unit ‘needed’”

Jan 2016 NHSreality: Accident and Emergency – departments understaffed – report suppressed

Doctors let dying patients waste their last days in Accident and Emergency

The Care Quality commission has different standards and reports in different jurisdictions

 

This entry was posted in A Personal View, Junior Doctors, Medical Education, Paramedics, Professionals, Rationing, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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