Tere is a toxic culture, and disengagement everywhere in Health and Social Care. Also in the CQC …

GP list sizes in England can be found here. 

Standards are falling in most areas because of the pressure of work both in Hospital and General Practice. Occasional well respected and popular training practices are the least under pressure. In social care standards are also falling, and one inspector (Greg Hurst reports in the Times 13th June 2019) has quit citing a toxic culture in the Care Quality Commission. He should be listened to, as there is a toxic culture, and disengagement everywhere in Health and Social Care. Of course there will always be examples of individuals who break the mould, but in general NHSreality says it as it is. The Times report is below..

Image result for toxic culture cartoon

Mary MacCarthy in Pulse December 2018: Cappling GP lists would make GPs and patients safer: 

Nick Bostock in GPonline 12th December 2018 reports that since 2004, there has been a 50% increase in GP list sizes.

and earlier that year, he reported with Teni Oluwunmi  that the number of GP practices had declined by 263!!

and last year, according to the Mail by 138

Emma Bower for GPonline 5th June 2019 also suggests that Scotland needs a new target for the GP workforce. With increasingly elderly population with multiple pathologies and complexity, 15 minute appointments are also needed. (BBC News)

Anal Carcinoma needs prevention with HPV vaccine? A nurse comments on her own illness…in Healthonline

Research in the US has discovered what the drug manufacturers should have found: drugs for shrinking enlarged prostates cause delay in the diagnosis if the prostate goes malignant. Another case of Big Pharma and overtreatment.

Barry Stanley-Wilkinson gives his exit interview from the CQC. (Greg Hurst reports in the Times 13th June 2019) has quit citing a toxic culture in the Care Quality Commission.

Waiting lists are getting longer, even for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Nick MacDermott in the Sun12th June 2019 so keep up the private insurance payments as long as you can, especially if you live in Wales.

An inspector whose report highlighting failings at a scandal-hit hospital was never published resigned from the regulator, protesting that some of its staff were too close to the private company that ran the hospital.

Barry Stanley-Wilkinson also complained of a “toxic” culture at the Care Quality Commission and said many of its inspectors felt that they worked in a “bullying, hostile environment”.

Mr Stanley-Wilkinson resigned six months after he led an inspection in 2015 of Whorlton Hall, a private hospital in Co Durham for adults with learning disabilities or autism. Police arrested ten carers at the hospital last month after Panorama on the BBC broadcast footage of staff appearing to mock and intimidate patients.

The inspector reported in 2015 that some patients had accused staff of bullying and inappropriate behaviour. He said patients did not know how to protect themselves from abuse and recommended that the hospital should be given a rating of “requires improvement”.

His report was never published and a new CQC team that inspected Whorlton Hall in 2016 gave it a “good” rating. Mr Stanley-Wilkinson’s resignation email, sent to the CQC in January 2016, was published yesterday by parliament’s joint committee on human rights, which took evidence from two CQC executives. He expressed frustration that his report on Whorlton Hall had not been published “despite significant findings that compromised the safety, care and welfare of patients”.

He referred to a complaint about his report by the hospital, which was then run by the healthcare company Danshell, and pointed out that it had previously been run by Castlebeck, which ran Winterbourne View, a care home where there had been an abuse scandal in 2011. Whorlton Hall was taken over by Cygnet Health Care this year.

“I am concerned about the relationship managers have had with the service,” Mr Stanley-Wilkinson wrote. “Discussions had taken place without my involvement despite me being the inspector.”

Paul Lelliott, deputy chief executive of the CQC, said the 2015 report had had inconsistencies and lacked evidence. Ian Trenholm, its chief executive, said the CQC planned to develop a new way to monitor institutions.

Image result for falling standards cartoon

 

This entry was posted in A Personal View, Consultants, Gagging, General Practitioners, Professionals, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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