Poverty and Wealth, and pregnancy rates. Will the slave society mean that Middlesborough et al supply the future low paid workforce?

The Economist in an article on 20th April reports on the state of childbirth demographics, and the differences between rich and poor areas.  Surprisingly, Wales is improving compared to the North East and even in Breast Feeding, although the length of time this applies to is not recorded in the Guardian figures…. How many of the IVF conceptions (3% of all) are private and how many public? The health divide ….. The Economist says it explains: Why the middle-aged are replacing teenagers in maternity wards – The conception rate is rising for women over 40, even as it crashes among under-18s.

There are many interesting graphics below, and the Teenage Pregnancy Rates in England and Wales) are most interesting. They do not include Scotland and N Ireland. Presumably Scotland similar to Wales, and N Ireland will have many, and fewer terminations because of their archaic laws.

Since most pregnancies are “high risk” in older first timers, will this mean that midwifery led units disappear? They should. (The risks in having babies in rural areas – midwifery-led units questioned by consultant.)

Will the slave society mean that Middlesbrough et al supply the future low paid workforce?

Maybe Later baby – The Economist 20th April

…. The conception rates of the youngest and oldest mothers are now close to converging (see chart). Middle-aged maternity may soon be more common than teenage pregnancy.

Advances in health care help to explain the convergence. Although assisted conception accounts for only a small proportion of pregnancies, it is growing more popular and more successful. Between 1991 and 2016, birth rates from in vitro fertilisation treatment increased by more than 85%. In 2016 more than 20,000 babies were born following IVF (out of a total of 696,000 births that year). About three-fifths of women who use it are 35 or over. Demand is likely to increase as women learn of others whose treatment has been successful. Ms Fenelon was inspired by a magazine article about egg-freezing……
Patrick Butler in the Guardian 2018: New study finds 4.5 million UK children living in poverty

New measure by Social Metrics Commission aims to focus political attention on the issue

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This entry was posted in A Personal View, Links, Midwives, Political Representatives and activists, Post Code Lottery, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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