You can’t get no satisfaction – and its going to get worse….

The 4 health services need money, especially if they are “free at the point of access”, and cradle to grave, without reference to means etc. Unfortunately we in the profession know this is unsustainable and hence the problems at Chester – refusing Welsh Patients. The money moves with the patient all around the 4 Health Services, so no wonder the commissioners refuse second opinions from outside their trust (These are the only ones that matter), and refuse inter trust transfers and referrals whenever possible. Just like in Dentistry, private services are going to thrive, whether GP advertising is banned or not… Cutting referrals means more private care.. 

The fines for long waiting lists have to be more than the cost of extra contractual referrals! Commissioners will coolly calculate the difference and lives will not be considered. 

We shame Aneurin Bevan’s ideal and even Stephen Hawking realised this.

Nick Triggle for BBC news 7th March reports: Satisfaction with NHS ‘hits 11-year low’

and this is particularly true in the Walsh border area around Chester.#

The Chester Chronicle reports: Satisfaction with NHS “at lowest since 2007”.

Public satisfaction with the NHS has fallen to its lowest level in more than a decade, despite the Government’s announcement of a funding boost, new research suggests.

Just over half of people (53%) in 2018 said they were very or quite satisfied with the way the health service is run, the British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey found.

This is down three percentage points from 2017 and the lowest proportion since 2007, according to analysis by the King’s Fund and Nuffield Trust.

In 2016, 63% of people were satisfied, compared to 65% in 2014.

Satisfaction with how the NHS is run is at its lowest since 2007 (PA Graphics)

 

(PA Graphics)

Ruth Robertson, senior fellow at the King’s Fund, said she was “surprised” by the results of the survey, in the year the NHS celebrated its 70th anniversary and was promised an additional £20.5 billion per year.

“We didn’t see this ‘birthday bounce’ that you might have expected in satisfaction,” she said.

The survey of almost 3,000 people in England, Scotland and Wales was carried out between July and October, after the funding announcement.

The main reasons people gave for being dissatisfied with the NHS overall were long waits for GP and hospital appointments (53%), not enough staff (52%), a lack of funding (49%) and money being wasted (33%).

More than two-thirds (71%) of those who were satisfied with the health service said it was because of the high quality of care, while 62% said it was the fact it is free at the point of use.

Older people were happier with how the NHS is run than younger people, with 61% of those aged 65 and over satisfied compared to 51% of those aged 18 to 64.

“Despite the outpouring of public affection around the NHS’s 70th birthday and the Prime Minister’s ‘gift’ of a funding boost, public satisfaction with how the NHS is run now stands at its lowest level in over a decade,” Ms Robertson said:

“In the short term at least, the promise of more money doesn’t appear to buy satisfaction.

“The public identified long-standing issues such as staff shortages and waiting times amongst the main reasons for their dissatisfaction and cash alone will not solve these.”

Satisfaction with GPs has hit its lowest level since the survey began (PA Graphics)

Satisfaction with GPs has also dropped two percentage points to 63%, the lowest level since the survey was first carried out in 1983.

Professor John Appleby, director of research and chief economist at The Nuffield Trust, said: “This may reflect continued strain on general practice, with mounting workloads and staff shortages and the evidence shows that people are finding it harder to get appointments than before.

“The NHS long-term plan expects even more of general practice – these problems will need to be addressed quickly if that vision is to be made possible.”

The analysts cautioned that there may be a “lag” before the money pledged by Theresa May has an impact on satisfaction levels.

However Ms Robertson added: “Two of the factors that people are telling us are big drivers of their dissatisfaction – waiting times and a lack of staff – are things that aren’t actually addressed in the long-term plan.

“We are waiting for the workforce strategy to come out to deal with the crisis we’ve got around workforce, and a review of waiting times as well.”

A spokesman for the NHS said: “For the third year in a row, public satisfaction with the quality of NHS care has improved and satisfaction with inpatient services is now at its highest level since 1993, however the results as a whole understandably reflect a health service still under pressure.

“The Long Term Plan sets out an effective blueprint for making the NHS fit for the future as funding comes on stream and does so on the back of the public’s enduring support for NHS services, with increasing satisfaction scores in the survey for both outpatients and inpatients.”

The Health Service is no longer National, and there is blatant finacial rationing because Wales has not paid up!

April 5th Chester Chronicle: English health trust accused of using Welsh patients as ‘bargaining …

BMJ 3rd April: David Oliver: The revolving door to the NHS lobby

The Guardian 31st Jan 2019: NHS England to ban GPs from advertising private services

The Herald Scotland 1st April: Margaret Taylor: It’s unforgivable for MPs to fiddle while our NHS burns

26th March 2019: CCGs continue to offer cash rewards for GPs to cut referrals

The Independent 15th February 2019: Tens of thousands of cancer patients left waiting months to start …

 

 

This entry was posted in A Personal View, Commissioning, General Practitioners, NHS managers, Perverse Incentives, Post Code Lottery, Rationing, Stories in the Media, Trust Board Directors on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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