How can the NHS offer fulfilling, lifelong careers? The managers have no idea why doctors quitting in droves…. Exit interviews?

The exit interview is a rare event in the 4 health services. The BMJ opinion from Wilson and Simpkin is honest and powerful, but their drawing attention to the absent “exit interviews” now needs attention, and from a completely independent HR company. None of the staff will trust the “in house” services. Yes, its got that bad, and its going to get worse. Life expectancy has peaked already and went down this last year….

The BMJ offers some advice on workforce retention: How can the NHS offer fulfilling, lifelong careers? BMJ 2019;364:l1100

With morale and retention among UK doctors declining, The BMJ hosted a discussion at last week’s Nuffield Trust health policy summit, asking what the NHS can do to support clinicians throughout their careers. Abi Rimmer reports

“Enabling people to pursue their other interests is one key thing,” said Rakhee Shah, paediatric registrar and research associate at the Association for Young People’s Health, kicking off discussions. She highlighted the importance of giving clinicians more control over their working lives.

Ronny Cheung, consultant paediatrician at Evelina London Children’s Hospital, took this further, saying that it was also important to give clinicians control over their everyday workload. He said that his trust, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, had been “trying to make time and space for teams to come together.”

“It’s about regaining control,” he said, “and investing in people to allow them to do that.” This not only made staff feel more valued but also helped to remind them what they enjoyed about their work. “It has a multiplying effect,” he said.

Claire Lemer, consultant at Evelina London Children’s Hospital, highlighted the importance of food for staff. She described a successful initiative at her hospital that encouraged the executive team to provide food for clinical and administrative staff……

……The demise of the firm structure of working in hospitals had reduced support for clinicians, said Morrow….

…The panel also discussed how the intensity of clinical work affects clinicians’ ability to maintain a long term career in the NHS. Lemer said that, in some specialties, “the pressure and intensity of work is so extreme that it’s not sustainable for a whole career.”…

…Cheung also warned that the rigidity of medical training pathways was denying doctors the flexibility they needed, as they were forced to choose a specialty so early in their career.

“If we squeeze people into these pathways we shouldn’t be surprised if people break free, and we shouldn’t be surprised that we’re developing a workforce that isn’t particularly happy,” he said.

Image result for exit interviews cartoon

The NHS is failing to look after its staff and patients, expert warns

Abi Rimmer, The BMJ

Anne Gulland, The BMJ

Opinion from Hannah Wilson and Arabella Simpkin is honest and ends with the paragraph: (This was not available in the on-line edition)

Quitting in DrovesHannah Wilson and Arabella Simpkin P 473 of the BMJ

Surprisingly, while there is little literature that discusses both the quantity of doctors that leave the NHS and the factors that may drive them, there is no literature discussing the attributes and characteristics of doctors that leave. To understand what is driving the flight, we must first ask who are the doctors that quit? Surprisingly exit interviews are rarely held. Yet this is critical information to develop interventions and strategies to stem the leak.

Image result for exit interviews cartoon

This entry was posted in A Personal View, Community Health Councils, Medical Education, Patient representatives, Political Representatives and activists, Professionals, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s