Advances in Diabetic care are rolled out at different speeds in different post codes.

There is a history of rationing new advances in medical care differently in different post codes and regions. Some things are too important for this type of random care. If it was open and honest, and announced in advance, for some cheap services rationing is appropriate: but of course it is not allowed to be talked about. The perverse incentive for commissioners to get away with what they can is too great..

Judy Hobson in the Mail in 2010: The alarm that can save diabetics’ lives (so why is the NHS rationing them?)

Faith Eckersall reports in the Daily (Dorchester) Echo 12th October: Diabetics to confront councillors over postcode lottery DORSET diabetics – including some children- will be part of a delegation at the county council on Wednesday to campaign for new testing technology free on the NHS.

Currently people with Type 1 diabetes must use the painful and inconvenient pin-prick method to check their blood sugar levels but Flash, which must be paid for in Dorset, works on a pain-free patch and scanning device.

The protestors are angry that despite the government’s NICE drugs and medicine rationing committee approving the use of Flash Glucose Monitoring on the NHS, Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group has not made it freely available, as has happened in adjoining health areas.

The CCG is running a six-month pilot of the Freestyle Libre blood glucose monitoring device for 200 people in three specific groups of diabetic patients in the county. But protestors point out there are 5,000 diabetics in Dorset who could potentially benefit and say no further testing or pilot is needed.

Diabetes UK south west regional head, Phaedra Perry, said: “The Dorset Clinical Commissioning group should make Flash available immediately to all people with diabetes in the area who can benefit, and not to just a very limited group of 200 patients for six months.

“Commissioners here are out of step with neighbouring CCGs which have agreed to prescribe it. Dorset is one of very few areas in the south west where Flash is not available and is effectively imposing a postcode lottery on diabetes technology.”

This entry was posted in A Personal View, Commissioning, Perverse Incentives, Rationing, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s