Artifical Intelligence is no threat to doctors, but it’s potential needs to be managed. A shortage of Radiologists is more bad news for the future.

All specialities depend on radiologists, and radiology. They, along with GPs have to have a deep knowledge of the whole human anatomy and physiology. Their skills are moving from diagnosis into treatment, as some tumours can be infarcted (have their blood supply cut off) at the same time as a diagnosis is made. Kidneys in particular lend themselves to this treatment. Artificial Intelligence is no threat to doctors, but it’s potential needs to be managed. A shortage of Radiologists is bad news for the future. The Economist confirms that in their view they will still be needed, but their skills will develop and change. Computers will become more and more useful for the reporting of routine, but more complex judgements have to be made by physicians. Radiologists are also the first physician to know of a bad diagnosis or prognosis, and therefore they are often “breaking bad news”. So their communication skills need to be good, as well as their radiological ones.

The Economist 7th June opined: From A&E to AI – Artificial intelligence will improve medical treatments – It will not imminently put medical experts out of work

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The whole article is below

Artificial intelligence will improve medical treatments

The RSNA News (Radiological Society of North America) points out the desperate shortage of radiologists in Scotland. Why is there such a “deepening gap in the workforce”, and what is a possible “big picture solution” that involves providing doctors form the UK rather than from 2nd and third world countries who can ill afford to lose them?

RSNA News June 2018

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Interview with Dr Ian Martin, Radiologist Withybush Hospital, Pembrokeshire 12th March 2013

 

 

 

This entry was posted in A Personal View on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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