Social care ‘close to collapse’ in most councils. The difference between public and private places, in the same homes, is “covert”, and needs to be routinely exposed.

Whilst Norway has a National Investment fund, which represents joint savings for unforeseen events, the UK has nothing. My pension is not funded from savings, or from my earnings, but from todays younger people in work. The reality of the shortfall for social care, and the difference between the bills paid by private customers as opposed to the state’s, are scandals. Families must ask for the difference between the private and the public funded places when their member first enters a home. Even if they still go ahead and are admitted, the truth is then out in the open. The difference between public and private places, in the same homes, is “covert”, and needs to be routinely exposed.

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Greg Hurst reports in the Times 12th June 2018: Social care ‘close to collapse’ in most councils

Three quarters of local authorities fear that their provision of residential homes and domiciliary care is close to collapse because of rising demand and reduced funding.

A survey found that 78 per cent were concerned that they may be unable to meet their duty to ensure a stable market for social care. Nearly half, 48 per cent, said that providers of home care, which are mainly private companies, had ceased to trade in their area in the past year and 44 councils said that companies had given up contracts because they were losing money.

The survey of 152 councils was by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. In addition to arranging adult care they have a duty to stimulate a diverse market for care provision.

The government announced a £2 billion boost for the care system last year. Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, is to publish plans to reform social care next month.

Comment from the Times:

The welfare state model is going to have to change. People are going to have to save for their retirement (and no, NI is not going to do it for you) like they do other things such as a mortgage and not expect the state (that is other taxpayers) to provide support because you couldn’t be bothered providing for it yourself. Of course there will be means tested exceptions, that it what the state is there for, a social safety net for those in true need who didn’t have the option of preparing for retirement. Being profligate whilst working and expecting others to pick up your bill when retired, doesn’t count!

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This entry was posted in A Personal View, Rationing, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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