So, you did not think there was post code rationing of cancer care?

Kat Lay reports 12th March 2018 in the Times: “UK behind on cancer guidelines” (she means treatments)

It may be very sensible to refuse treatments for which there is a poor return, and serious side effects. The spending of state money has to be rationed, but NHSreality maintains that this should be overt, and universal for the low volume high cost treatments. Aneurin Bevan talked about In Place of Fear ( A Free Health Service 1952 Chapter 5 In Place of Fear ) but we are doing our best to bring back fear. There are four British health café systems, each rationing differently. In each we pay up under the same tax rules. The UK is also behind on introduction of new drugs – for good reason. Mark Littlewood doesn’t believe is deserves the taxpayer funding it gets! The Times also explains why and how more people are having to pay for cancer treatments which are excluded. Sarah Kate-Templeton reports on the current private income from treating cancers privately in 2017: £360m

British cancer guidance is less likely to recommend innovative drug treatments for patients than versions used in other parts of Europe, a study has found.

Researchers at King’s College London evaluated clinical practice guidelines issued by different national bodies, finding that UK examples were more likely to focus on surgery, and slower to pick up on new research.

Their study comes after several high-profile cases where patients have had to travel abroad for treatment.

The Home Office is considering allowing a medical cannabis trial to treat Alfie Dingley, a six-year-old boy with epilepsy, who travelled to the Netherlands to take a cannabis-based medication last September. Jessica Rich, one of two sisters with Batten disease, a genetic disorder that kills sufferers before they reach their teens, has to fly to Germany for treatment with a drug that Nice will not fund and Ashya King, now eight, was taken to the Czech Republic by his parents for proton therapy on a brain tumour, against the recommendation of doctors in Southampton in 2014. Earlier this month his family announced that scans showed he was free of cancer.

The study, published in Esmo Open BMJ, found recommendations in continental Europe tended to focus on the use of new chemotherapy agents or targeted treatment, while UK guidelines tended to focus on surgery, screening or radiotherapy.

Mark Baker, director of the centre for guidelines at Nice, insisted the research was “poorly undertaken” and misrepresented its guidance .

 

This entry was posted in A Personal View, Community Health Councils, Political Representatives and activists, Post Code Lottery, Rationing, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s