Hearing loss and dementia: more research is needed. Patients with hearing aids in hospital need special consideration, and for over 70s, that’s over 60% of us …

More research is needed into the relationship between hearing loss and dementia. Patients with hearing aids in hospital need special consideration, and for over 70s, that’s over 60% of us … The rationing of hearing aids is patently perverse, and the outcome could be more long term dementia care demand on the state. And of course the politicians making the decisions today will not be those addressing the future problem.

Image result for hearing loss and dementia cartoon

A letter from Dr Ted Leverton in the JRCGP October 2017 reads: 

Iliffe and Manthorpe’s editorial in the August issue1 is apposite in view of the publication in July of the Lancet Commissions’ report Dementia prevention, intervention, and care, which expands on several of the themes raised.2 In particular, the editorial’s focus on the role of general practice in prevention and research is to be welcomed. However they do not mention hearing loss, to which the Lancet report devotes considerable space and ascribes a significant potential preventive role. Hearing loss is independently associated with developing dementia in about one-third of cases.

Recent research has suggested that use of hearing aids may reduce or prevent the increased prevalence of dementia seen in adults with hearing loss.3,4 This needs confirmation, as current evidence is weak due to the large number of confounding factors. General practice is ideally suited to carry out this research thanks to our large-scale and long-duration databases. In the meanwhile, GPs are likely to see increasing numbers of patients asking for referral for hearing aids, as some in the commercial sector are stating this benefit of hearing aids as fact. Such referral should be expedited; GPs are sometimes accused of minimising hearing loss and delaying referral, but early users of hearing aids are more likely to use aids successfully over a longer timescale as they can be difficult to use. Hearing loss is associated with depression and social isolation;5 denial of the disability is common, as is irritability and interference with relationships. By the age of 70 years, 70% of GP patients have hearing loss. If in doubt, or if the patient is reluctant, a simple validated screening test is available over the phone or online.6


  1. (2013) Hearing loss and cognitive decline in older adults. JAMA Intern Med 173(4):293299. Lin FR, Yaffe K, Xia J,et al.
  2. (2015) Hearing loss and cognition: the role of hearing aids, social isolation and depression. PLoS One 10(3):e0119616, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4356542/ (accessed 5 Sep 2017). Dawes P, Emsley R, Cruickshanks KJ, et al.
  3. Action on Hearing Loss. Check your hearing. https://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/your-hearing/look-after-your-hearing/check-your-hearing/take-the-check.aspx (accessed 5 Sep 2017).
This entry was posted in A Personal View, Consultants, General Practitioners, Guest, Nurses, Paramedics, Professionals, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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