The facts, What doctors earn – except that GPs are self employed and you wont know their overhead/expenses/debts which will vary by GP and by practice.

BMJ has helpfully published the latest data on GPs (BMJ Aug 30th article by Tom Moberly

Data chart: what doctors earn

Authors: Tom Moberly

Publication date:  30 Aug 2017


In 2016, the mean annual pay for all doctors working full time in the UK was £78 386, according to figures published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

The ONS data show that 78% of doctors work full time. For the remaining 22% who work part time, the mean annual pay was £46 277. Across all doctors, working full time or part time, the mean pay was £71 455.

Separate figures on doctors’ earnings are published by NHS Digital, and these figures provide data on the earnings of different sections of the workforce.

These figures show that, in 2014-15 (the latest period for which these data are available), the mean earnings for GPs was £101 500. This figure is for income before tax, but after expenses, for salaried GPs and partners working under either general medical services or personal medical services contracts.

For consultants and other hospital doctors, NHS Digital has published data on earnings in the year up to March 2017. These show that the mean earnings for consultants were £111 563. For specialty and associate specialist doctors they were £69 336, and for all doctors in training, mean earnings were £49 318 (£55 629 for those in higher specialty training, £47 420 for those in core training, and £36 122 for those on the foundation programme).

The ONS data show that, between 1997 and 2016, mean pay across all doctors increased from £36 849 to £71 455.This equates to an average annual increase of 3.5% over that period.

What doctors earn

Consultants £111 563
GPs £101 500
Specialty and associate specialist doctors £69 336
Trainees (higher specialty training) £55 629
Trainees (core training) £47 420
Trainees (foundation programme) £36 122

Source: NHS Digital. Note: GP data are for 2014/15; other data are for 2016/7.

Tom Moberly UK editor BMJ

This entry was posted in Consultants, General Practitioners, Junior Doctors, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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