Why not implement no-fault compensation? Because it needs a longer term perspective and a PR system to get it through.

Frances Gibb reports in The Times 23rd June 2017: Medical negligence payouts ‘unaffordable’

Reforms to curb the soaring costs of medical negligence, which could see taxpayers paying out £2.6 billion a year by 2022, must go ahead, a report has urged.
The NHS spent £1.5 billion on clinical negligence claims last year, enough to train more than 6,500 doctors, the Medical Protection Society said. The not-for-profit organisation , which supports 300,000 healthcare professionals worldwide, is calling for a package of legal reforms that would strike a balance between compensation that is reasonable but also affordable.
Its proposals include a cap on future care costs which would be paid on a tariff to be agreed by an expert working party. It also wants to use national average weekly earnings to calculate damages awarded, to avoid unfairness between high and low-income earners.

and the comments are good as well. In Wales the amount set aside for future litigation/compensation is more than one year’s budget. Why not implement no-fault compensation scheme? Because it needs a longer term perspective and a PR system to get it through. Apologies would then be like confetti..

Image result for confetti cartoonand that’s not to mention apologies from our masters re both contract and staffing levels:

Image result for medical apology cartoon

Scotland (and I hope Wales will follow) has announced legislation to protect doctors if and when they apologise. Doctors in Scotland get legal protection when apologising, explains MDU

Doctors in Scotland are being given legal protection when apologising to patients, the Medical Defence Union (MDU), explained today.

The Apologies (Scotland) Act 2016, the relevant part of which comes into force on 19 June 2017, makes it clear that an apology (outside of legal proceedings) is not an admission of liability. In the new Act, an apology is defined as:

‘…any statement made by or on behalf of a person which indicates that the person is sorry about, or regrets, an act, omission or outcome and includes any part of the statement which contains an undertaking to look at the circumstances giving rise to the act, omission or outcome with a view to preventing a recurrence.’

Mr Jerard Ross, MDU medico-legal adviser, said:

‘Saying sorry to a patient when something has gone wrong is the right thing to do and is an ethical duty for doctors. The Apologies (Scotland) Act provides further reassurance to doctors that apologising is not an admission of legal liability. In the MDU’s experience, a sincere and frank apology and explanation can help restore a patient’s confidence in their doctor following an error and help to rebuild trust. This is important for a patient’s future healthcare and can help to avoid a complaint or litigation.’

Doctors have a professional duty of candour, set out in the General Medical Council’s Good medical practice which states: ‘You must be open and honest with patients if things go wrong. If a patient under your care has suffered harm or distress you should put matters right (if that is possible), offer an apology, explaining fully and promptly what has happened and the likely short-term and long-term effects.’

A legal duty of candour was also introduced for health and social care providers in Scotland under The Health (Tobacco, Nicotine etc. and Care) (Scotland) Act 2016 although it has yet to be brought into force by enabling legislation. It will mean that doctors and other health and social care staff in Scotland will have to inform patients and their families when a patient has, in the reasonable opinion of an uninvolved registered health professional, died or been unintentionally or unexpectedly mentally or physically harmed as a result of their care or treatment.

Although the Apologies Act does not apply to the legal duty of candour, the Health Act itself makes it clear that ‘an apology or other step taken in accordance with the Duty of Candour…does not of itself amount to admission of negligence or breach of a statutory duty’.

The GMC has published ethical guidance on the professional duty of candour which explains in more detail what constitutes an effective apology for healthcare professionals. This includes advice that apologies should not be formulaic and that the most appropriate team member, usually the lead clinician, should consider offering a personalised apology, rather than a general expression of regret.

In Wales the amount set aside for future litigation/compensation is more than one year’s budget.

David Williamson for Walesonline 30th Dec 2016 : More than £600m allocated to pay for clinical negligence and personal injury claims against the Welsh NHS in the future

In the last financial year £74.6m was paid out and £682m has been set aside for future payments

NHS faces ‘compensation time bomb’ as clinical negligence …  GP online25 Jul 2016

520 results (0.30 seconds)

BBC News28 Nov 2016

 

Image result for medical apology cartoon

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This entry was posted in A Personal View, Political Representatives and activists, Stories in the Media, Trust Board Directors on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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