Doctors warn NHS is rationing best drugs to cut costs

Far better to have fairness in rationing so that all of us know what is excluded, wherever we live. Devolution and GP Commissioning have ensured inequality, and covert rationing of fearful conditions. Remember, drugs do not improve the health of populations… This is an issue for public health consultants, but are there any left?

Image result for public health cartoon

Jon Ungoed-Thomas in the Sunday Times 16th April reports: Doctors warn NHS is rationing best drugs to cut costs

Hospital doctors have revealed how some of the best available medicines are being rationed by the NHS in a cost-cutting drive.

Doctors including gastroenterologists, rheumatologists and dermatologists say they are being prevented from prescribing the most appropriate drugs by their local clinical commissioning groups (CCGs).

CCGs are already reducing the number of hip and knee operations by using pain thresholds to ration procedures.

Now a survey of 200 clinicians, commissioned by the drugs company UCB and conducted by ComRes, has found that seven out of 10 clinicians claim NHS funding pressures have restricted their ability to prescribe approved medications.

The Breast Cancer Now charity revealed last year that some women were missing out on a potentially life-saving drug that costs 43p a day. Bisphosphonates cut the risk of cancer spreading to the bone, but many CCGs have blocked their use.

Dr Thomas Sheeran, a consultant rheumatologist at the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, said bureaucratic hurdles and financial restrictions were hampering clinicians. “It’s frustrating that the people we have to try to persuade are accountants and the CCGs,” he said.

In one case last year he said a woman at risk of going blind was turned down by her local CCG for £2,000 of drugs to save her sight. The woman was admitted as an emergency patient so the trust could pay for treatment.

The drug in question, infliximab, is approved for use by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) for some conditions, but the treatment for this patient was considered experimental.

Sheeran said another drug used to treat arthritis and approved by Nice, abatacept, was not being permitted by Wolverhampton CCG for some patients.

He said there were concerns that patients who were not given the most suitable drug were more likely to be readmitted to hospital, so the drive to cut the drugs budget was in fact not cost effective.

Patients are entitled to drugs approved by Nice for specific conditions, but there is often no national guidance and CCGs make their own funding decisions.

A spokesman for NHS England said: “As the NHS goes into the most financially challenging few years in its history, it is right that we strive to ensure maximum value for patients from every penny available, but ultimately these are legally decisions for clinical commissioning groups, informed by best evidence and national guidance where appropriate.”

A spokesman for Wolverhampton CCG said that although it could not comment on individual cases, “a number of individual funding requests have been approved for the prescribing of abatacept”.

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This entry was posted in A Personal View, Commissioning, Post Code Lottery, Rationing, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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