Nursing degree applications fall by a fifth – a two tier service is evolving by neglect.. State basic, and Private enhanced.

Most of the doctors feel that Nursing took the wrong course when they tried to push through the degree increments and “Agenda for change” demands in the first decade (2004) of the century. GPs as self employed businesses resisted most as our funding was not future proofed. Those who capitulated are regretting it now. Stephanie Jones-Berry reports in “Primary Health Care”.and Greg Hurst reports in The Times 17th December: Nursing degree applications fall by a fifth despite the Agenda for change”  This decline is a disaster for those of us in our sixties and seventies who hoped for the quality of nursing care our parents received. Continuous neglect, rationing of training places in medicine, and over borrowed nurses-in-training, and Agenda for change has led to government preferring to hire nurses and doctors from abroad, at cheap rates of pay, rather than train our own, with whom patients have cultural affinity and good communication.

A two tier service is evolving in Medical and Nursing care, by neglect: state basic, and private enhanced. It would be better this change was managed and overt..

Image result for nurse shortage cartoon

Applications for nursing degrees have fallen sharply since the government withdrew their funding via bursaries and forced students to pay for their courses with loans.

Universities said last night that applications for nursing, midwifery and allied health courses were down by about 20 per cent compared with this stage last year. In some institutions applications have halved.

Shortfalls in applications were worse in London and the southeast, among mature candidates and in specialist fields such as learning disability nursing, occupational therapy and podiatry. There are fears that some small courses may become too expensive to run if numbers dip too low.

It is too soon to judge if the fall will mean fewer student nurses starting in September next year but universities are considering contingency plans to avert a shortfall in nursing graduates, including accelerated two-year postgraduate nursing courses.

Vice-chancellors are planning a campaign with health bodies to encourage more people to train as nurses, which is likely to run well beyond the normal deadline for university course applications next month to encourage candidates to make late submissions or apply through clearing in the summer.

Some caution is needed with the figures as the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service says year-on-year comparisons are complicated this year because calendar dates mean we are two or three working days behind last year’s cycle, and university applications generally are running behind last year’s figures. But the drop in applications for nursing, midwifery and allied health subjects is twice that of other courses, according to a survey by the vice-chancellors’ body Universities UK (UUK).

Ministers claimed that ending the bursaries would create 10,000 more training places, as costs are met by students taking out loans rather than direct government funding. It would be an embarrassment if numbers fell.

Janet Davies, head of the Royal College of Nursing, said her organisation had consistently raised concerns to the government that its decision would result in a drop in applications. “Our advice fell on deaf ears. The government went ahead in gambling on the future of the nursing workforce,” she said.

Steve West, vice-chancellor of the University of the West of England and chairman of UUK’s health policy network, said that the numbers were down. “We want to ensure . . . we get the right message out that there are fantastic career opportunities in nursing.”

Vice-chancellors say that mature students are likely to find it harder to take on a student loan of £27,000 to fund their degree and worry that potential student nurses may not fully understand that they will only start repaying once they earn above £21,000.

A Department of Health spokesman said that it was too early in the application process to predict reliable trends, adding: “We are committed to increasing the number of training places for homegrown nurses, as well as making sure there are more routes into nursing including through apprenticeships.”

The RCN is concerned the effects on the future workforce will be exacerbated by Brexit and an ageing population.

To date many midwives and nurses have not been able to “demonstrate they can communicate effectively”. Communication and cultural barriers in health acknowledged. Litigation results..

In an undercapacity market who can blame the nurses or doctors? £190m is “comeuppance” for politicians. NHS nurse recruitment from EU ‘too aggressive’!

Not enough nurses or doctors? Or are we just inefficient? The situation is a disgrace and a scandal, and needs a war like atmosphere of honesty to address it…

London GP services crisis pending… Overseas doctors will probably fill the vacancies. Watch for private GPs and Private A&E departments in the capital…

Not enough doctors – just keep lowering the bar & reducing the funding

A third of A&E doctors leaving NHS to work “in a non toxic environment” abroad

 

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This entry was posted in A Personal View, Junior Doctors, Nurses, Rationing, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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