70% of NHS staff ‘confused’ over healthcare structure – and the conclusion that reform will be accepted is wrong

The Price Waterhouse survey and report into the structure and responsibility and accountability within their Regional Health Care area is not surprising. The general disengagement and disillusion is endemic now, and will need a revolution to change.. To draw the conclusion that the staff are willing to accept their suggested reform from a loaded questionnaire at a time of financial restraint is premature. The staff know rationing is needed. Did the questionnaire ask about rationing overtly? Of course not..  Similar with Exit Interviews? ….

Image result for structure nhs collapsing cartoon

From “The Commissioning Review” 4th November 2016: 70% of NHS staff ‘confused’ over healthcare structure

Nearly three quarters of healthcare workers say they do not understand the role of national healthcare bodies, a survey of over 1000 NHS staff has found.

The report from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) called for the Government to clarify their role and move to a more devolved system where local areas are given more accountability and responsibility.

PwC surveyed more than 1,000 NHS staff and over 2,000 members of the public in England to gain the views of both those within and outside of the system.

The results show a high level of confusion and frustration across the board with 71% of NHS staff believing the entire system should be reformed.

PwC suggests delegating responsibility for managing the health and care system in their areas to Sustainability and Transformation Planning (STPs) and creating a new care management board or merging NHS Improvement and NHS England to simplify the structure of the current health and care system.

Over the longer term the company suggests devolving accountability by allowing regional care groups to become democratically accountable bodies with responsibility for commissioning health and social care and giving the leaders of these bodies the power to raise funds through taxation.

Alan Milburn, former Health Secretary and chair of the PwC Health Industries Oversight Board, said: “Despite the best efforts of its leaders to make it work, the current national architecture is confused and complex. The artificial divide between health and social care makes as little sense as the division of labour between a myriad of national bodies.

“Organisational change is always a risk but without it, the move towards integrated local care systems will be undermined.

“This report sets out a long-term reform agenda towards an NHS in which the balance of power moves from national to local level where services are delivered.”

Some 66% of NHS staff in England are also frustrated by the division between health and social care, saying it is bad for patients.

As a result the report also calls for health and social care to be brought under one department, away from the current system where social care sits with the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG).

David Morris, PwC partner and author of the report, added: “Our research highlights a persistent underlying sense of confusion about the roles of national bodies in the NHS, coupled with frustration over the division between health and social care. Evidently there is growing appetite for reform.”

BBC News 3rd November 2016: NHS structures ‘complex and confused’

Price Waterhouse has several useful reports such as: Report– Update on Waterhouse Report – “Lost in Care (2000)

The National Health Executive (NHE) website reports 3rd November 2016: Milburn warns current NHS structures ‘complex and confused’

The current national system of healthcare oversight is too confused and should be replaced by local bodies, along the lines of sustainability and transformation plans (STPs), with the power to commission health and social care, according to a new report from PwC.

The ‘Redrawing the health and social care architecture’ review, led by former health secretary Alan Milburn, said that the attempt to delegate responsibility for health to CCGs under the Health and Social Care Act 2012 “may have worked” with more time, but was instead “an imperfect plan from which policymakers were forced to beat a hasty retreat”….

…Some 66% of NHS staff in England are also frustrated by the division between health and social care, saying it is bad for patients.

As a result the report also calls for health and social care to be brought under one department, away from the current system where social care sits with the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG).

David Morris, PwC partner and author of the report, added: “Our research highlights a persistent underlying sense of confusion about the roles of national bodies in the NHS, coupled with frustration over the division between health and social care. Evidently there is growing appetite for reform.”

Image result for structure nhs collapsing cartoon

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This entry was posted in A Personal View, Commissioning, Post Code Lottery, Rationing, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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