Surge in twins linked to obese young mothers: UK is one of the worst places in western Europe to be pregnant and have a baby: a ‘no go’ area for a politician but we should break out of the consensus on the NHS and learn from other countries..

The rise in multiple births, older mothers and “first” deliveries as a percentage of the whole, mean that specialist units should become the place of choice for expectant mothers. These will be further apart than the current provision, but the relative inconvenience is worth the better outcomes.. The extra deaths reported by the Institute of Economic affairs can be criticised (how can 3 countries deny having any unnecessary deaths?) but we all need to take notice in the round…

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Kate Gibbons reports in The Times 22nd October: Surge in twins linked to obese young mothers

The number of twins being born in Britain has reached a five-year high, largely due to overweight mothers in their twenties.twinsSource: Institute of Economic Affairs

While rates of twins and triplets has decreased slightly in older women, who are more at risk of multiple births, the number of women under 30 giving birth to more than one baby has increased by 3 per cent in a year.

Figures from the Office for National Statistics showed that last year 13.3 out of every 1,000 births to women aged 25 to 29 were multiple births, up from 12.9 in 2014. Experts said that while high rates of twins and triplets in older women can be explained by age or increased use of fertility treatment, it could be due to weight in the case of younger mothers.

Women with a body mass index (BMI) higher than 30 have significantly increased odds of giving birth to non-identical twins, studies found. The healthy range for BMI is 18.4 to 24.9….

The Mail: Number of twins being born in Britain reaches a five-year high – thanks to overweight mothers in their 20s

iNews: Obesity rates could be behind rise in number of women having multiple births

NHS advice: Overweight and pregnant – Pregnancy and baby guide – NHS

Tim Shipman in The Sunday Times 23rd October 2016 reports the “excess” deaths in the English NHS. You can add 10% if you include the other Health Services: Up to 46,000 die each year as NHS lags behind world’s best (Up to 46,000 die each year as NHS lags behind world’s best)

Extract: ….Even if the UK only matched the 12th-best country for each condition, more than 17,000 lives could be saved.

In a foreword to the report, Paterson described the figures are “shocking” and called for the government to learn lessons from overseas.

“The NHS has become a ‘no go’ area for a politician but we should break out of the consensus on the NHS and learn from other countries,” he said.

“The most alarming finding is that 46,413 people die each year because they were treated on the NHS rather than by the healthcare system with the best health outcomes in the world..

Read Tim Shipman’s full article: up-to-46000-die-early-in-the-uk

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This entry was posted in A Personal View, Political Representatives and activists, Rationing, Stories in the Media, Trust Board Directors on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

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