Cancer waiting times compared

The statistics for Wales

http://gov.wales/docs/statistics/2015/151118-nhs-cancer-waiting-times-quarter-september-2015-en.pdf

  • 84.3 per cent of patients (484 out of 574) newly diagnosed with cancer via the Urgent Suspected Cancer route started definitive treatment within the target time of 62 days.
  • 96.5 per cent of patients (775 out of 803) who were newly diagnosed with cancer not via the Urgent route started definitive treatment within the target time of 31 days.
  • One of the six LHBs met the target that at least 95 per cent of patients newly diagnosed with cancer via the Urgent route should start definitive treatment within 62 days. One of the six LHBs met the target that at least 98 per cent of patients newly diagnosed with cancer not via the Urgent route should start definitive treatment within 31 days.

And for England

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/11/Cancer-Waiting-Times-Q2-2015-16-Press-release-Commissioner-based-PDF-135kB.pdf

The key points from the latest release are: The key results for outpatient services and pathways ending with first definitive treatments show that, for cancer patients whose care was commissioned by the English NHS, during the period July to September 2015:

Two week wait: 93.5% of people were seen by a specialist within two weeks of an urgent GP referral for suspected cancer (93.6% in Q1 2015/16 ) 92.4% of people urgently referred for breast symptoms (where cancer was not initially suspected) were seen within two weeks of referral (93.4% in Q1 2015/16 )

One month (31-day) wait from diagnosis to first definitive treatment: 97.5% of people treated began first definitive treatment within 31 days of receiving their diagnosis, all cancers (97.4% in Q1 2015/16 )

Two month (62-day) wait from urgent GP referral to first definitive treatment: 81.9% of people treated began first definitive treatment within 62 days of being urgently referred for suspected cancer by their GP, all cancers (81.7% in Q1 2015/16 )

62-day wait extensions 87.8% of patients began first definitive treatment within 62 days of a consultant’s decision to upgrade their priority, all cancers (88.8% in Q1 2015/16 ) 93.9% of people began first definitive treatment for cancer within 62 days of referral from an NHS cancer screening service, all cancers (93.1% in Q1 2015/16 )

The key results for waiting times for second or subsequent treatment show that, in England, during the period July to September 2015: 31-day wait for subsequent treatment: 95.8% of people began treatment within 31 days where the subsequent treatment was surgery (95.0% in Q1 2015/16 ) 99.6% of people began treatment within 31 days where the subsequent treatment was an anti-cancer drug regimen (99.6% in Q1 2015/16 ) 97.5% of people began treatment within 31 days where the subsequent treatment was a course of radiotherapy (97.5% in Q1 2015/16 ) More detailed commentary and analyses are published as part of this statistical release on the NHS England website.

Scotland

Key points In the period July to September 2015:

The 62 Day Standard is that 95% of patients urgently referred with a suspicion of cancer will wait a maximum of 62 days from referral to first cancer treatment.

· Nine out of ten (90.0%) of patients started treatment within the 62 day standard. This is a reduction compared to 92.1% in the previous quarter.

· Four NHS Boards met the 62-day standard. This compares to eight NHS Boards meeting the standard in the previous quarter.

· Two of the ten cancer types successfully met the 95% standard – these were breast (97.3%) and melanoma (96.9%). The 31 Day Standard is that 95% of all patients will wait no more than 31 days from decision to treat to first cancer treatment.

· 95.2% of patients started treatment within this standard. This is a slight reduction to the figure for the previous quarter (96.3%). The standard was met by 11 NHS Boards. The NHS Boards who did not meet the standard were – NHS Grampian (92.3%), NHS Highland (94.5%), NHS Tayside (91.5%) and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (94.0%).

· The 31 day standard was met for eight of the ten main cancer types. Waiting times for treating urological cancer remains the most challenging, with 86.5% treated within 31 days, this is a reduction on the previous quarter which was 89.8%. The other cancer type below the standard was head and neck (94.1%)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s