Health is closely correlated to Wealth – If you are poor you get no choice (Wales), and live a shorter life, but if you are rich, or born abroad, you live longer and you do get choice! So much for equity…

The Times (Jill Sherman and Deirdre Howell) reports 10th May 2014: Families priced out of commuter belt Health is closely correlated to wealth. Should we pity these S.E. people for all the financial drivers in their lives, or should we commiserate because they have a long commute, less wildlife, and have to tolerate traffic jams daily? These are also the areas with most “born abroad”. If you are poor you get no choice (Wales), and live a shorter life, but if you are rich, or born abroad, you live longer and you do get choice! So much for equity…

Young middle-class families are being priced out of home ownership throughout much of southeast England, as they now have to earn about £60,000 a year to get a foot on the ladder.

A new analysis reveals the large gap between the salaries of young professionals and the amount they need to scrape together for a deposit and mortgage.

Research shows that even in outer London boroughs a first-time buyer needs a salary of up to £70,000 to afford a home, while in inner London a minimum salary of £100,000 is required.

It reveals for the first time how the housing boom is spreading into the commuter belt and southern university towns, where under-35s now need to earn at least £55,000 to get a toehold in the housing market.

This means that most single young professionals in the south are locked out of the property market until their 40s, or are force to rely on a gift or loan from their parents. In Guildford, Epsom, Windsor and St Albans they would have to be on salaries of £60,000, nearly twice average incomes in the area. In other parts of the south, such as Chichester, Horsham, Sevenoaks and Winchester, first-time buyers would need to earn £50,000…..

Life expectancy in the UK Posted on June 9, 2011 by James – Women on the left, men on the right

Regional differences in life expectancy in the UK - women (left) and men

Choice delusion

 

 

 

 

This entry was posted in A Personal View, Stories in the Media on by .

About Roger Burns - retired GP

I am a retired GP and medical educator. I have supported patient participation throughout my career, and my practice, St Thomas; Surgery, has had a longstanding and active Patient Participation Group (PPG). I support the idea of Community Health Councils, although I feel they should be funded at arms length from government. I have taught GP trainees for 30 years, and been a Programme Director for GP training in Pembrokeshire 20 years. I served on the Pembrokeshire LHG and LHB for a total of 10 years. I completed an MBA in 1996, and I along with most others, never had an exit interview from any job in the NHS! I completed an MBA in 1996, and was a runner up for the Adam Smith prize for economy and efficiency in government in that year. This was owing to a suggestion (St Thomas' Mutual) that practices had incentives for saving by being allowed to buy rationed out services in the following year.

1 thought on “Health is closely correlated to Wealth – If you are poor you get no choice (Wales), and live a shorter life, but if you are rich, or born abroad, you live longer and you do get choice! So much for equity…

  1. Pingback: Medical Schools: your chances – applications-to-acceptance ratio was 11.2. | NHS reality. An NHS soapbox. Speakers' corner for the NHS.

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